Regarding the dubious Tafsir that was published recently in America

To the honourable scholars, al-salam ‘alaykum.

Recently, an English translation and commentary of the Quran entitled ‘the Study Quran’, was published. It was undertaken by a group of western academics. The work includes Shia, Sunni, Sufi tafsir, in addition to several essays as appendices. Unfortunately, in spite of some benefits in the work, the authors have, while commentating on certain verses, presented interpretations that accord with the belief in the universal validity of religions. For instance, during the discussion on the tafsir to the verse: Truly the religion in the sight of God is submission (3:20), it says:

Many Muslims say that this verse shows that the only religion acceptable to God is the one revealed to the Prophet of Islam, but the most universal meaning of it, which been emphasised by many Islamic authorities over the ages, is that Islam in this verse refers to submission to God even if it is not in the context of Islam as the specific religion revealed through the Quran … [p. 135]

The reader is then referred to the essay at the end of the book entitled ‘The Quranic View of Sacred History and of Other Religions’ in which it is argued that previous scriptures and religions are not abrogated by Islam:

The notion that previous scriptures have been abrogated in the sense of being nullified or excessively distorted to such an extent that the message no longer reflects  the particularity of the original teachings, as some Muslims maintain, would seem to be contradicted by verses such as 5:43: And how is it that they come to thee for judgement …  It would be contradictory for the Quran to speak of the efficacy of judging by the Torah and the Gospel if it were to also maintain that these Scriptures have been abrogated or excessively distorted … If the previous religions were abrogated by the revelation of the Quran, it will be implausible to tell the Prophet Muhammad to seek their counsel when it says, Ask the people of the Reminder, if you know not. [p. 1767]

Regarding the verse: Whoever seeks a religion other than submission it shall not be accepted of him… (3:85), it says:

However, the idea that 3:85 abrogates 2:62 is connected to the interpretation expressed by some commentators that this verse denies the “acceptability” of any form of religion other than that brought by the Prophet Muhammad. This opinion is not without its inconsistencies, however, since it does not take into account the more general and universal use of Islam and muslim in the Quran to refer to all true, monotheistic religion… [p. 153]

Moreover, regarding the interpretation of the verse on the Christian trinitarian belief: They certainly disbelieve, those who say, “Truly God is the third of three,”… [5: 73], it says:

However, the verse clearly threatens punishment only for those among them who disbelieved, suggesting that it is not for all Christians. Moreover, an interpretation that considers all Christians to be barred from the garden in the next life would openly contradict both v. 69 and 2:62 where Christians and anyone who believes in God and the Last Day and works righteousness shall have the reward with their Lord. No fear shall, upon them, nor shall they grieve, and is not consistent with the description of Christian virtue in vv. 82-85. [p. 316-17]

The same author says in the above-mentioned essay as he speaks about the concept of trinity criticised in the Quran:

And say not “Three.” Refrain! … (4:171) … They certainly disbelieve, those who say,” Truly God is the third of three…” This, however, is not a direct condemnation of Christian theology, for trinitarian theology does not make God one of three, but rather speaks of the triune God, Who is both one and three in a manner that transcends human understanding. Viewed in this light, 5:73 does not oppose the various forms of orthodox trinitarian doctrine that have prevailed for most of Christian history. Rather, it appears to oppose crude misunderstandings of it that would lead one to believe that there are three gods instead of one. [p. 1779]

Similar notions to the above are frequently found throughout the work.

The author of another essay, also within the work, states the following on the matter of perpetuity of hellfire:

During the early period of Islam, scholars differed about the duration of Hell. The majority of them argued that Hell is perpetual and an actualised state that never ends. But some groups argued otherwise, citing verses that hinted at an end to Hell’s torment and arguing that this was more consistent with God’s saying, ‘My Mercy exceeds My Wrath.’ Thus the scholars fell into three camps. The first believed that although Hell did not end, its punishment and torment did. The proof for this was the verse: Truly Hell lies in ambush, a place unto which the rebellious return, to tarry therein for ages (78:21-23). This was the opinion of Aḥmad ibn Taymiyyah, Ibn Qayyim, and Ibn al-ʿArabī; a similar opinion that the majority of Hell’s denizens are ultimately released also appears to have been held by al-Ghazzālī, as is evident in his Fayṣal al-tafriqah (Decisive Criterion). [p. 1849-50]

The work would probably not have gained much popularity were it not for certain popular Muslim preachers in West who promoted and endorsed the work unconditionally without any caution against its absurd interpretations and false beliefs; one of them went to the extent of describing it as ‘A major victory and a gift from god’, and another said, ‘It is probably the best work in English to date’ and called it ‘A mercy from God.’ This latter individual made the matter worse by allowing the hosting of an event in his Islamic institute in America wherein one of the translators of the work was invited to speak about the book. None of the panel attendees refuted or challenged his claims. Instead, they encouraged the attendees to purchase a copy of the book at the end of the session and get it signed by the translator.  Since the book has gained much popularity and is increasingly bought we fear that it will pollute the minds of readers and therefore seek your guidance and fatwa in regards to the following questions:

1. What is the status of those who believe in the validity of all religions other than Islam, claiming that it does not abrogate the previous religions: does it take them out of the pale of Islam even if they an interpretation (ta’wil) for such a belief?

2. What is the ruling on believing that Hellfire or its torment will eventually extinguish? Is there a valid scholarly disagreement over the issue?

3. What is the ruling on promoting, endorsing, and encouraging people to buy and read such a work, knowing full well its contents, without cautioning readers against the problematic points?

4. What is the ruling on laymen reading such a work?

Answered by Shaykh Muḥammad Tawfīq Ramaḍān:

In the Name of Allah, the All Merciful, the Most Merciful

Praise be to Allah, the Unique, the One, the Singular, the Everlasting Sustainer, who has not given birth and was not born, and no one is comparable to Him, and blessings and peace be upon our master Muḥammad and upon his family, all of his companions and those who follow them on the path of truth until the Day of Repayment. To proceed:

I have looked at the explanation (tafsīr)[1] of certain verses from the Book of Allah which offends what the people of truth are upon and contradicts the Qurʾānic texts with interpretations that are inconsistent with what is correct. I believe that whoever stated them is upon misguidance in his theology and whoever has followed him is obliged to return to the path of truth. If not, then one becomes one of those whom Allah, may His affair be manifest, described by saying: “Do you, then, believe in one part of the Book and reject the other? What repayment will there be for any of you who do that except disgrace in this world? And on the Day of Standing, they will be returned to the harshest of punishments. Allah is not unaware of what you do.” [Sūrat al-Baqarah 2:85]

Indeed the Book of Allah the Exalted has commanded us to debate kindly with the People of the Book[2] whom we differ with regarding what they believe about our master ʿĪsā (Jesus), peace and blessing be upon him or ʿUzayr (Uzair), peace and blessings be upon him. The Book of Allah calls on the People of the Book to have faith in our master Muḥammad, may Allah’s peace and blessings be upon him, and it does not consider those who disbelieve in our master Muḥammad to be from the people of salvation nor does it consider those who believe Allah to be the third of three or that the Messiah is the son of Allah to be from the people of salvation.[3] Our theology is not taken from those who are suspect in their theology nor from those who flatter those who contradict the truth, seeking to ingratiate themselves while having certain interests, or something similar, in mind.

Indeed a tafsīr like this aims to ruin the Muslims and to take them away from the true paths of knowing their religion and their theology. Indeed, treating the People of the Book kindly is one thing and presenting relinquishments to them in violation of our theology and our Revealed Law is something else. The obligation to debate with the People of the book in the kindest of ways is one thing and violating what is clear in the Book of Allah, seeking to ingratiate oneself with them, is something else.

Indeed the belief that the People of the Book, with the beliefs that they currently hold, are not disbelievers contradicts what is clear in the Book of Allah, and the circulation of such publications is one of the waves of misguidance that Muslims are exposed to, in addition to their other afflictions.

Likewise, the belief that the people of the Fire are not in there eternally is inconsistent with the Exalted’s statement: “As for those who disbelieve in Our Signs, We will roast them in a Fire. Every time their skins are burned off We will replace them with new skins so that they can taste the punishment. Allah is Almighty, All-Wise.” [Sūrat an-Nisāʾ 4:56] and other verses that clearly show that the people of the Fire are therein eternally and that the people of Paradise are therein eternally, and this is aside from what this tafsīr ignores from the clear, authentic Prophetic ḥadīths on this matter. This shows that the authors of this tafsīr have shunned the Exalted’s statement: “And we have sent down the Reminder to you so that you can make clear to mankind what has been sent down to them so that hopefully they will reflect.” [Sūrat an-Naḥl 16:44] Al-Bukhārī has related on the authority of Abū Saʿīd al-Khudrī, may Allah be pleased with him, who said, ‘The Messenger of Allah, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, said, {Death will come in the form of a black and white ram and then a caller will call out, ‘O people of Paradise’, and at that point they will stretch their necks and look. He will say, ‘Do you know what this is?’ They will respond, ‘Yes. This is death.’ and all of them will have seen it. Then he will call out, ‘O people of the Fire’, at which point they will stretch their necks and look. He will say, ‘Do you know what this is?’ They will respond, ‘Yes. This is death.’ and all of them will have seen it. It will thus be slaughtered and then he will say, ‘O people of Paradise, eternity and thus no death, and O people of the Fire, eternity and thus no death.’} Then he recited, “Warn them of the Day of Bitter Regret when the affair will be resolved. But they take no notice [i.e. the people of this worldly life]. They do not believe.” [Sūrat Maryam 19:39]

Indeed circulating books like this is to take part in misguiding and in serving the plan to disrupt the thinking of the Ummah away from the right path. And Allah knows best.

The servant of knowledge: Muḥammad Tawfīq Ramaḍān

[Translated by Mahdi Lock]

[1] (tn): because it is not actually possible to fully translate the Qurʾān, and thus any so-called translation is in fact only a conveyance of some of the meanings, and therefore it’s an explanation, or tafsīr

[2] (tn): for instance, see Sūrat an-Naḥl 16:125

[3]  (tn): for instance, see Sūrat al-Māʾidah 5:72-73

Maliki School: The Timbukti Syllabus

The Timbukti syllabus is an old method of teaching; it was the exact method of teaching adopted by scholars in Medina before and after Imam Malik: A student reads before the scholar, just like children read to the teacher, and if he makes a mistake, the teacher corrects him. The teacher interprets and explains the sacred texts to the student. The order that is followed in teaching the series of books of jurisprudence (fiqh)—according to the Maliki school—differs from place to place and from one school to another. However, the most common order is as follows:

  1. Qawāʿid aṣ-Ṣalāh (or Kawaʿidi) is a treatise of about thirty pages by an unknown author. It concerns the principles of prayer and articles of faith.
  2. Mukhtaṣar al-Akhḍarī by Abū Zaid ʿAbdur-Raḥmān al-Akhḍarī, which is an introduction to Islamic jurisprudence (fiqh) with emphasis on purification of the heart (taṣawwuf), ritual purity (tahārah) and prayer (ṣalāh).
  3. Al-ʿAshmāwiyyah by ʿAbd al-Bārī al-ʿAshmāwī ar-Rifāʿī, which is an introductory text that covers ritual purity (tahārah), prayer (ṣalāh) and fasting (ṣawm). It is studied alongside:
  4. Manẓūmah al-Qurṭubī fiʾl-ʿIbādāt by Yaḥyā al-Qurṭubī, which is another introductory text covering the five pillars of Islam: creed (ʿaqīdah), prayer (ṣalāh), fasting (ṣawm), alms (zakāh) and pilgrimage (ḥajj) to the holy sanctuary.
  5. Al-Muqaddimah al-ʿIzziyyah by Abul Ḥassan ʿAlī ash-Shādhilī is an intermediate text that concerns the jurisprudence of worship (ʿibādāt), commercial transactions (muʿāmalāt), as well as social ethics. It is studied alongside:
  6. Naẓmu Muqaddimah Ibn Rushd by ʿAbd ar-Raḥmān ar-Rāfiʿī, which is an intermediate text that adds to Manẓūmah al-Qurṭubī. It explains the jurisprudence concerning the five pillars of Islam in detail.
  7. Al-Risālah by Abū Muḥammad ʿAbdullāh ibn Abī Zayd al-Qayrawānī is another intermediate text in the school. The first half is on worship (ʿibādāt), the second concerns aspects of jurisprudence such as marriage (nikāḥ), divorce (ṭalāq), commercial transactions (muʿāmalāt), inheritance (mīrāth), punishments (ḥudūd) and social ethics. This text has the distinction of being continuously taught for over a thousand years—the only fiqh text to have reached us with tawātur (mass-transmission). One unique feature is that the author often uses prophetic traditions (ahādīth) to construct the wording of the text.
  8. Al-Murshid al-Muʿīn by Ibn ‘Āshir, which is an extensive text, categorised into three sciences: Ashʿarī Theology (ʿaqīdah), Maliki Jurisprudence (fiqh) and Spirituality (taṣawwuf) based on the spiritual path of Imam Junaid al-Baghdādī.
  9. Miṣbāh al-Sālik by ʿAbd al-Waṣīf Muḥammad is one of the first advanced books of the Maliki school that is studied before studying later advanced works. This book covers theology, all chapters of jurisprudence (worship, marriage, transactions, commerce, judicial law etc.), and social ethics (akhlāq).
  10. Aqrab al-Masālik by Aḥmad bin Muḥammad bin Aḥmad ad-Dardīr is an advance text that is an abridgement of al-Khalil’s Mukhtaṣar. The author leaves out the differences of opinion, and clarifies some difficult passages from Mukhtaṣar.
  11. Mukhtaṣar Khalīl by Khalīl ibn Isḥāq al-Jundī is the last advance text that is covered by the students of the Maliki school.  It concerns the differences of opinion among major authorities within the school. It has an unrivalled position in the later Maliki school and is the relied upon and mufta bihi text today.


Hausa Women in the Twentieth Century, edited by Catherine M. Coles, Beverly Mack
Maliki Law: The Predominant Muslim Law in Nigeria, by Barr. Abdullahi Ghazali

Shaykh Abdal Hakim Murad’s Book Recommendations

[compiled 6 April, 2009]

Shaykh Abdal Hakim Murad

Timothy Winter
Sheikh Zayed Lecturer in Islamic Studies
University of Cambridge

Timothy John Winter (born 1960), aka Shaykh Abdul Hakim Murad, is a British Muslim thinker, professor, and translator. Winter has written about the interaction between Islam and secular issues spanning a wide range of disciplines. He has held a number of lectureships and administrative posts in British academia having to do with theology, the intellectual history of Islamic civilization, and international academic cooperation…[Read More]


  1. Abdel, Haleem M. A., trans. The Qurʼan (New York: Oxford UP, 2005).
  2. Du Pasquier, Roger. Unveiling Islam (Cambridge: Islamic Texts Society, 1990).
  3. Emre, Yunus. The City of the Heart: Yunus Emre’s Verses of Wisdom and Love. trans. Süha Faiz (Shaftesbury, Dorset: Element, 1992).
  4. al-Haddad, Abdullah. The Book of Assistance (London: Quilliam Press, 1989).
  5. Hammad, Ahmad Zaki. Lasting Prayers of the Quran and the Prophet Muhammad (Bridgeview, IL: Quranic Literacy Institute, 1996).
  6. Hofmann, Murad Wilfried. Islam: the alternative (Reading: Garnet, 1993).
  7. Ibrahim, Izzedien and Denys Johnson-Davies. trans. Forty Hadith (Beirut, 1983).
  8. Khan, Maulana Wahiduddin. Islam and Peace (New Delhi: Goodword, 1999).
  9. Lawrence, Bruce. The Qur’an: a biography (New York, 2007).
  10. Lings, Martin. Muhammad: his biography based on the earliest sources (Cambridge: Islamic Texts Society, 1986).
  11. Maqsood, Ruqaiyyah Waris. The Muslim Marriage Guide (London: Quilliam, 1995).
  12. Masri, Al-Hafiz Basheer Ahmad. Animal Welfare in Islam (3rd ed. Leicester: Islamic Foundation, 2007).
  13. Murad, Abdal Hakim. Muslim Songs of the British Isles, Arranged for Schools (London: Quilliam Press, 2005).
  14. al-Nawawī, Yaḥyā Ibn-Šaraf. Al-Maqasid: Imam Nawawi’s Manual of Islam. trans. Noah H. Keller (Evanston: Sunna Books, 1994). English translation and appendices by Sheikh Noah Ha Mim Keller.
  15. Schleifer, Aliah. Mary the Blessed Virgin of Islam (Cambridge: Islamic Texts Society, 1998).
  16. Shalabi, Abdul Wadod. Islam Religion of Life (London: Quilliam Press, 1990).
  17. Stockton, Peter. Transcending Jerusalem (Stockton, 2008). Web. <>.
  18. Tawfiq, Idris. Gardens of Delight: A Simple Introduction to Islam (London: Stacey International, 2007).
  19. Winter, Tim, and John A. Williams. Understanding Islam and the Muslims: The Muslim Family and Islam and World Peace. (Louiville KY: Fons Vitae, 2002).
  20. Wolfe, Michael. The Hadj: an American’s pilgrimage to Mecca (New York: Atlantic Monthly Press, 1993).
  21. Wolfe, Michael, ed. Taking Back Islam: American Muslims Reclaim their Faith (New York: Rodale, 2002).
  22. Yusuf, Hamza. The Creed of Imam al-Tahawi (Hayward CA: Zaytuna, 2007).


  1. Akhtar, Shabbir. A Faith for All Seasons: Islam and the challenge of the modern world (Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 1990).
  2. al-Akiti, Shaykh Muhammad Afifi. Defending the Transgressed by Censuring the Reckless against the Killing of Civilians (U.K.: Aqsa Press, and Germany: Warda Publications, 2005).
  3. Asad, Muhammad. The Message of the Quran (new edition, London: The Book Foundation, 2008).
  4. Ayub, Muhammad. Understanding Islamic Finance (New York: Wiley, 2008).
  5. Burckhardt, Titus. Art of Islam: language and meaning. Commemorative edition (Bloomington: World Wisdom, 2009).
  6. Esposito, John and Mogahed, Dalia. Who Speaks for Islam: What a Billion Muslims Really Think (New York: Gallup Press, 2007).
  7. Hallaq, Wael B. Islamic Legal Theories: an introduction to Sunni usul al-fiqh. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997).
  8. al-Hanbali, Ibn Rajab. The Compendium of Knowledge and Wisdom (London: Turath Publishing, 1428/2007).
  9. Helminski, Camille Adams. Women of Sufism: a Hidden Treasure (Boston: Shambala, 2003).
  10. Izetbegovic, Alija. Islam between East and West (Indianapolis: American Trust Publications, 1984).
  11. al-Jawziyya, Ibn Qayyim. The Invocation of God: al-Wabil al-Sayyib min al-Kalim al- Tayyib. Tr. Michael Abdurrahman Fitzgerald and Moulay Youssef Slitine (Cambridge: Islamic Texts Society, 2000).
  12. Kamali, Mohammed Hashim. The Dignity of Man: An Islamic Perspective (Cambridge: Islamic Texts Society, 2002).
  13. Legenhausen, Muhammad. Islam and Religious Pluralism (London: Al-Hoda, 1999).
  14. Lumbard, Joseph E.B. ed. Islam, Fundamentalism, and the Betrayal of Tradition (Bloomington IN: World Wisdom, 2004).
  15. Mahmutcehagic, Rusmir. The Mosque: the heart of submission (Fordham: Fordham University Press, 2007).
  16. Momen, M. An Introduction to Shii Islam (London: George Ronald, 1999).
  17. Roald, Anne Sofie. Women in Islam: the Western experience (London: Routledge, 2001).
  18. Sheikh, Aziz and Gatrad, Abdul Rashid. eds. Caring for Muslim Patients. Second edition (Abingdon: Radcliffe, 2008).
  19. Siddiqi, Muhammad Zubayr. Hadith Literature: its origin, development and special features (Cambridge: Islamic Texts Society, 1993).
  20. Tura, M. Nusret. The Path of Love (Istanbul: Insan, 2008).
  21. Winter, Timothy. ed. The Cambridge Companion to Classical Islamic Theology (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008).
  22. Yaran, Cafer S. Understanding Islam (Edinburgh: Dunedin Academic Press, 2007).


  1. Açar, Halil Rahman. Is Scientific Knowledge Rational? (Istanbul: Insan, 2008).
  2. Açıkgenç, Alparslan. Being and Existence in Sadra and Heidegger (Kuala Lumpur: ISTAC, 1993).
  3. Akhtar, Shabbir. The Quran and the Secular Mind: A Philosophy of Islam (London: Routledge, 2007).
  4. Bakar, Osman. Classification of Knowledge in Islam (Cambridge: Islamic Texts Society, 1998)
  5. Hacinebioglu, Ismail Latif. Does God Exist? Logical foundations of the cosmological argument (Istanbul: Insan, 2008).
  6. Iskenderoglu, Muammer. Fakhr al-Din al-Razi and Thomas Aquinas on the Question of the Eternity of the World (Leiden: E.J.W. Brill, 2002).
  7. Jackson, Sherman A. On the Boundaries of Theological Tolerance in Islam: Abu Hamid al-Ghazali’s Faysal al-Tafriqa (Karachi: Oxford University Press, 2002).
  8. Kamali, Muhammad Hashim. Principles of Islamic Jurisprudence (Cambridge: Islamic Texts Society, 1997).
  9. Koshul, Basit Bilal and Kepnes, Steven, eds. Scripture, Reason and the Contemporary Islam-West Encounter: Studying the ‘Other’, Understanding the ‘Self’ (New York and Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007).
  10. al-Misri, Ibn Naqib. Reliance of the Traveller: A Classic Manual of Islamic Sacred Law. Trans. Nuh Keller (Beltsville: Amana, 1993).
  11. Murad, Abdal Hakim. Bombing without Moonlight: the Origins of Suicidal Terrorism (Bristol: Amal Press, 2008).
  12. Murata, Sachiko. The Tao of Islam: a sourcebook on gender relationships in Islamic thought (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1992).
  13. Nasr, Seyyed Hossein and Leaman, Oliver, eds. History of Islamic Philosophy (New edition. London: Routledge, 2001).
  14. al-Said, Labib. The Recited Koran: a history of the first recorded version (Princeton: Darwin Press, 1975).
  15. Sentürk, Recep. Narrative Social Structure: Anatomy of the Hadith Transmission Network 610-1505 (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2005).
  16. al-Shafi’i. Al-Shafi’i’s Risala: Treatise on the Foundations of Islamic Jurisprudence, tr. Majid Khadduri (Repr. Cambridge: Islamic Texts Society, 1987).
  17. Shihadeh, Ayman, ed. Sufism and Theology (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2007).
  18. Shihadeh, Ayman. The Teleological Ethics of Fakhr al-Din al-Razi (Leiden: E.J.W. Brill, 2006).
  19. Yazdi, Mehdi Ha’iri. The Principles of Epistemology in Islamic Philosophy (Albany NY: State University of New York Press, 1992).

Shaykh Ibrahim Osi-Efa’s Book Recommendations

shaykh ibrahim osi efa

A draft list of books recommended by Shaykh Ibrahim Osi-Efa, collected by his students. The list is in no particular order.

  1. In the Absence of the Sacred – Jerry Mander
  2. Deep Nutrition – Catherine Shanahan
  3. On Disciplining the Soul – Al-Ghazali
  4. Breaking the Two Desires – Al-Ghazali
  5. Words and Rules – Steven Pinker
  6. Outliers – Malcolm Gladwell
  7. The Tipping Point – Malcolm Gladwell
  8. Milestones – Syed Qutb
  9. The Islamic Struggle in Syria – Dr Umar Faruq Abdullah
  10. Sea Without Shore – Shaykh Nuh Keller
  11. The Art Of Memory – Frances Yates
  12. Confessions of an Economic Hit Man – John Perkins
  13. Reflections – Shaykh Gai Charles Eaton
  14. The Value of Time – Shaykh Abd al-Fattah Abu Ghuddah
  15. Autobiography of Malcolm X – Malcolm X
  16. Mastery – Roberte Greene
  17. Brainsex: The real difference between men and women – Anne Moir & David Jessel
  18. Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee – Dee Brown
  19. Orality and literacy – Walter J Ong
  20. How to make Friends and Influence People – Dale Carnegie
  21. In praise of slow by Carl Honore Emotional Intelligence – Daniel Goleman
  22. Blink – Malcolm Gladwell
  23. Don’t think of an Elephant – George Lakoff
  24. Dumbing us down: The hidden curriculum of complusory schooling – John Taylor Gatto
  25. Unschooled Mind – Howard Gardner
  26. Ghosts in our blood – Jan Carew
  27. God and the new Physics – Paul Davies
  28. Hidden Messages in water – Masaru Emoto
  29. The Book of five rings – Miyamoto Musashi
  30. The Shallows: How the internet is changing the way we think, read and remember – Nicholas Carr,
  31. Mastery -George Leonard
  32. What the dog saw and other adventures – Malcolm Gladwell
  33. Who moved the stone? – Frank Morison
  34. Islam and the destiny of Man – Charles Le Gai Eaton
  35. Our Master Muhammad, The messenger of Allah – Imam ‘Abdallah Sirajuddin al-Husayni
  36. Evolution’s End: Claiming the potential of our intellgence
  37. The holographic universe – Michael Talbot
  38. How to create a mind – Ray Kurzweil
  39. The accident universe: The world you thought you knew – Alan Lightman
  40. Exploring the crack in the cosmic egg: split minds and meta-realities – Joseph Chilton Pearce
  41. Darwin’s Black box – Michael J. Behe

Feel free to comment with any book recommendations from Shaykh Ibrahim Osi-Efa that we have missed out.